End of Life

At Latah Creek Animal Hospital, we understand that pets are part of your family and deserve to be honored, both during and after life. The human-animal bond is unique and should be respected and remembered.

APPOINTMENT

While the end-life-life process can be difficult, know that you aren’t alone…we’re here for you every step of the way. From helping you make the difficult euthanasia decision to making the process as stress-free as possible, we provide the guidance you need. We also offer different cremation options for your beloved pet.

Saying Goodbye

Once you’ve made the difficult decision to euthanize your pet, there are a few additional options to consider:

  • Where will the euthanasia be performed?
    • This may be at the clinic or in your home. In-home euthanasia services are provided by Tranquil Passings @ 509-931-0466
  • Do you wish to be present for the euthanasia, and if so, what family members will also want to attend?
  • What do you want to say or do with your pet before he or she passes?
  • Do you wish to have cremation services or home burial?
  • If you choose cremation, do you wish to have the ashes returned to you? If so, do you want a special urn or other memorial container?

Everyone reacts differently to loss and grief. There are many resources available to help prepare for the grieving process, including how this process can be different for our children during the various stages of their development. Please review these resources for additional information to help you and your family prepare for this loss.

Plan Ahead for Pet Loss

Along with your veterinary team, we want you to have information you can trust about facing the loss of your beloved pet. ​It’s not easy to face loss. Yet, experts say the process may be a bit easier to bear when you make key decisions before your pet is euthanized. These decisions might include determining:

  • who may want to see your pet to say good-bye
  • where you hope to say your final good-byes
  • what you wish to do with your pet’s body

Making these decisions before your pet dies may help you be:

  • less likely to have regrets about how your pet died and how you said good-bye
  • less anxious about facing death
  • more ready and prepared to support your children and others who also love your pet

There are many steps you can take now to prepare, like:

  • talking with your veterinary team about the kind of support they offer, as well as the euthanasia services they provide
  • organizing details about memorials, body care, and child care (if you need it during the appointment time for euthanasia)
  • finding support for yourself via the pet loss resources in your area or those listed on this website

Pet Loss Resources

Horizon Hospice-Pet Loss
608 E. Holland Ave
Spokane, WA 99218
509-489-4581
www.pet-loss.net/emotions.shtml

The First Year of Grief: Help for the Journey
Marty Tousley, CNS-BC, FT, DCC, Distance Credentialed Counselor
TousleyM@aol.com
www.griefhealing.com

ASPCA Pet Loss Hotline
877-474-3310
www.aspca.org/pet-care/general-pet-care/end-life-care

Cornell University Pet Loss Support Line
(staffed by Cornell veterinary students)
607-253-3932
www.vet.cornell.edu/Org/Petloss/

Other Resources

Veterinary Wisdom® Pet Parents Facebook Group
www.facebook.com/groups/petparentswisdom/